• Questions  for Andrew Cowan on the novel Crustaceans by Kouhei Furuya, Yuko Kato, Jun Ohashi, and Takuya Osada. Part 2 Tokyo University, 7 December 2003 First of all, many thanks for your generous response to our previous interview.  Your answers were very helpful and informative, we felt, though with one exception.  It was hard to understand your method of writing. As well as writing and revising each line, do you come back later and revise every line again?  Once you decide on the nature of Euan’s accident, for example, there is clear foreshadowing earlier on.  Why bother with so much earlier revision if you have to come back and revise again later? On the whole, I don’t come back and

    Dec 07,
  • From The Observer, 23/11/2003 The Observer Richard Beard Sunday November 23, 2003 It mattered so much, and it turned out so well. I don't know which was harder to believe, that England won or that it could matter so much in the first place. Whatever the differences between Australia and England as nations, this week has proved that we have one fundamental weakness in common: we get far too uptight about sporting fixtures. But at last, after so long, in this area of human behaviour known as sport, we have managed to behave more successfully than the Australians. If it sometimes seemed, in the excitement of yesterday's final, that the identity of each individual spectator and ultimately of the nation

    Nov 23,
  • Questions  for Andrew Cowan on the novel Crustaceans by Kouhei Furuya, Eri Higuchi, Yuko Kato, Jun Ohashi, Akira Ohkubo, and Takuya Osada. Tokyo University, 6 November 2003 Your book, Pig, was a story about a pig. The word 'crustacean' is quite difficult, unfamiliar, and were you not afraid that the readers will find it difficult to imagine that this novel is about a father-son relationship with this title? Have you ever thought of having another title? No, this was always going to be the title. It has three kinds of resonance for me.  1.  It's a word of private significance for Paul, because it's the first word he imagines teaching his new-born son.  2.  It has seaside connotations. 3. It

    Nov 06,
  •   You will need three English coins of the same denomination, preferably silver and minted in the same year.  Heads, our Queen, is warp. She is light, warm, strong, rigid, active, odd. Tails is weft: dark, cold, supple, passive, restful, and even. Although weft is weak and warp is strong, there is strength in weakness, and weakness in strength.The English Book of Changes is an oracle that responds to sincere meditation on any given situation, exploring both its correctness and its consequences. The wisdom of the Book is based on ancient texts handed down through generations, their origins often lost. They take into account your present circumstances, analyse possibilities for action, and frequently refer back to your past. The ideal

    Jul 12,