News & Events

  • Biographies by popular critic and satirist Craig Brown and award-winning author Jonathan Eig join the latest books by American academic Maya Jasanoff and acclaimed writer Richard Beard in the shortlist for the £10,000 biography prize. Full announcement here.  

    Apr 03,
  • Richard Lloyd Parry’s definitive book on the 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami, Richard Beard’s memoir of exceptional power about loss, carrying on, and recovering a brother’s life, and Xiaolu Guo’s acutely observed account of growing up in China, each, in very different ways, triumphantly affirm the unique role creative non-fiction plays in making sense of our complex world. Full announcement here.

    Apr 03,
  • The Day That Went Missing has been chosen as a Book of the Year 2017 in the Sunday Times, the New Statesman, the Irish Times (International Non-fiction Book of the Year), the Evening Standard, the Tablet and the Times Higher Education Supplement. Extracts and links: '... more than just a study on grief, exploring memory and the savagery of the stiff upper lip. No book has moved me more this year.' Rosamund Urwin, Evening Standard 'A study in bereavement, it is very much more than that: an interrogation of memory, of the English class system, of the limits of language. It also features a surprising amount of cricket. I read nothing this year that I admired quite as much.' Tom Holland, New

    Dec 11,
  • 'The Sunday Times Literary Editor Andrew Holgate joins the author to discuss The Day That Went Missing, a heart-rending memoir about a life unspoken after the sudden death of Richard’s younger brother and how he is beginning to make sense of it all.' I'm at Cheltenham for the fantastically titled Sunday Times Must Read event on the afternoon of 12 October 2017. All the details, venue and tickets, are here.

    Aug 29,
  • At the age of fifteen, in 1980, at St Mary’s RC Grammar School in Blackburn, Graham Caveney was sexually abused by his headmaster, Father Kevin O’Neill. Caveney’s subtitled Memoir of an Adolescence starts with this fact, as how could it not? The trauma is ‘something that the survivor, the sufferer, carries within them; the wreckage that is part of their self.’ What Caveney brilliantly achieves in this powerful, distinctive memoir is the positioning of his repeated sexual abuse in the landscape of an early 80’s adolescence. Before the abuse, Caveney is a clever, bookish boy born into the ‘Respectable Working Class’ of Accrington, his dad a groundsman at the local comprehensive and his mum a factory worker. He is not

    Aug 29,
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